Tuesday, January 8, 2013

Extreme Piping


When I first started playing the pipes years ago, my instructor - a former Marine and a history buff - drilled into me an important piece of piping etiquette. Once one has commenced a tune, one does not stop piping until said tune is completed. Period. No matter what. There is NO excuse for not finishing the tune, unless you are killed in action. But you have to be killed outright. If you are wounded, you had better pull yourself together and finish the tune. One of my sisters was privilege to hear the never stop piping speech, and for a while afterwards - thanks in no small part to encouragement from the instructor - it was a favourite past time of various family member to behave like lunatic whilst I was at practice, in an effort to make me laugh, and stop playing. The net result of this is that I am quite proficient at ignoring distractions during my practice, which is a good thing, as people can behave very oddly when they encounter a piper unexpectedly.

This picture, however, takes the idea of extreme piping to a whole new level:



That is a picture of Bulgarian men, celebrating the Feast of the Epiphany in the Tundzha River. CNN has a photo gallery of Epiphany celebrations from around the world, and this is only one of the many odd pictures to be featured there. According to the caption, the pipers (and the drummer too, for that matter) are participating in a dance. Why? I do not know, but I rather think striding into icy cold water and piping might be even more macho that the Polar Plunge.


9 comments:

Jack said...

I shall say this for pipers, you are all devoted. Especially those men.

Treskie said...

*Snickersnort* More macho than the polar plunge indeedy. Bagpipes aren't supposed to get wet, are they? That seems kind of dangerous....

Pipers in Scotland, stand on sidewalks.

Pipers in America usually do the same thing?

Meanwhile.... in Bulgaria.... *grin*

Anonymous said...

crazy pipers :) I tried to add you into the group. You were not pleased!

God Bless
Bella

Molly said...

And I got all whiny to myself today, just because I had to go and find a park to practice in. A park, I said. Not a puddle. I am ashamed.

Jack said...

Quirky titles are some of my favourites, though I've been finding a lack of them in my book hunting lately.

I am glad you like book two's title - and The Broken Blade as well.

Amy said...

This is very very odd. And that's about all there is to it.

Katrina DeLallo said...

Fellas, we may be up to our chests in water, but WE WILL NOT STOP PIPING! It is simply NOT DONE!

Heather said...

I enjoy listening to pipers. They are fascinating, not only their sound but how they work.

Mahri said...

Heather ~ thanks for stopping by and commenting. I was quite indifferent to bagpipes until I went to my first Scottish Games and heard them live. I became quite obsessed with them after that - everything from the music, to the history associated with them. I was never so excited about anything as when I discovered I could get piping lessons locally.